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Volume 36, issue 3 | Copyright
Ann. Geophys., 36, 867-878, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-36-867-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Regular paper 14 Jun 2018

Regular paper | 14 Jun 2018

A statistical study of the spatial distribution and source-region size of chorus waves using Van Allen Probes data

Shangchun Teng1,2, Xin Tao1,2, Wen Li3,4, Yi Qi1,2,5, Xinliang Gao1,2, Lei Dai6, Quanming Lu1,2, and Shui Wang1,2 Shangchun Teng et al.
  • 1Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
  • 2Collaborative Innovation Center of Astronautical Science and Technology, China
  • 3Center for Space Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • 4Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • 5Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  • 6State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, CAS, Beijing, China

Abstract. The spatial distribution and source-region size of chorus waves are important parameters for understanding their generation. In this work, we analyze over 3 years of continuous wave burst-mode data from the Van Allen Probes mission and build a data set of rising-tone and falling-tone chorus waves. For the L shell range covered by Van Allen Probes data (3.5 ≤ L ≤ 7), statistical results demonstrate that the sector where rising tones are most likely to be observed is the dayside during geomagnetically quiet and moderate times and the dawn side during active times. Moreover, rising-tone chorus waves have a higher occurrence rate near the equatorial plane, while the falling-tone chorus waves have a higher possibility to be observed at lower L shell and higher magnetic latitudes. By analyzing the direction of the Poynting wave vector, we statistically investigate the chorus source-region size along a field line, and compare the results with previous theoretical estimates. Our analysis confirms previous conclusions that both rising-tone and falling-tone chorus waves are generated near the equatorial plane, and shows that previous theoretical estimates roughly agree with the observation within a factor of 2. Our results provide important insights into further understanding of chorus generation.

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This paper performs a statistical study of the spatial distribution and source region size along a filed line of both rising tone and falling tone whistler waves based on the Van Allen Probes data. The results suggest that both types of chorus waves are generated near the equatorial plane, roughly consistent with previous theoretical estimates. The work should be useful to further understand the generation mechanism of chorus waves.
This paper performs a statistical study of the spatial distribution and source region size along...
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