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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 34, issue 11
Ann. Geophys., 34, 1045-1051, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-34-1045-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Ann. Geophys., 34, 1045-1051, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-34-1045-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Regular paper 17 Nov 2016

Regular paper | 17 Nov 2016

GPS network observation of traveling ionospheric disturbances following the Chelyabinsk meteorite blast

Feng Ding1,2, Tian Mao3, Lianhuan Hu1,2, Baiqi Ning1,2, Weixing Wan1,2, and Yungang Wang3 Feng Ding et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 2Beijing National Observatory of Space Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 3National Satellite Meteorological Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, China

Abstract. We use the Global Positioning System (GPS) network in northwest China and central Asia to monitor traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), which were possibly excited by the large meteorite blast over Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February 2013. Two TIDs were observed. The first TID was observed 13min after the blast within a range of 270–600km from the blast site. It propagated radially from the blast site with a mean velocity and period of 369ms−1 and 12min, respectively. The second TID was found in northwest China, 1.5h after the time of the blast, at  ∼ 2500–3100km from the blast site. This latter TID propagated southeastward with a velocity and period of 410ms−1 and 23min, respectively. Severe dissipation of the perturbation total electronic content (TEC) amplitude was observed. Any TIDs propagating in a global range was not found after the meteorite blast. Features of TIDs were compared with those excited by early nuclear explosion tests. It is inferred from our analysis that the energy release of the Chelyabinsk meteorite blast may not be large enough to excite such ionospheric disturbances in a global range as some nuclear explosions did.

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Two traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) were observed by the GPS network in Asia following the large meteorite blast over Chelyabinsk, Russia. No TIDs propagating in a global range were found. Features of TIDs were compared with those excited by early nuclear explosion tests. It is inferred from our analysis that the energy release of the Chelyabinsk meteorite blast may not be large enough to excite such ionospheric disturbances in a global range as some nuclear explosions have done.
Two traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) were observed by the GPS network in Asia following...
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