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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 31, issue 2
Ann. Geophys., 31, 377–385, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-31-377-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Ann. Geophys., 31, 377–385, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-31-377-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Regular paper 28 Feb 2013

Regular paper | 28 Feb 2013

Observations of poleward-propagating large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances in southern China

F. Ding1,2, W. Wan1,2, B. Ning1,2, B. Zhao1,2, Q. Li3, Y. Wang4, L. Hu1,2, R. Zhang3, and B. Xiong1,2 F. Ding et al.
  • 1CAS Key Laboratory of Ionospheric Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 2Beijing National Observatory of Space Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 3National Earthquake Infrastructure Service, Beijing, China
  • 4National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, China

Abstract. We report here on two cases of poleward-propagating large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) in China during a medium-scale storm between 27 May and 1 June 2011. The observations were conducted by making use of the Global Positioning System network and ionosondes in China and Southeast Asia. One northeastward-propagating LSTID occurred on the morning of 30 May, while the other was observed during the nighttime of 1 June. Both poleward-traveling LSTIDs occurred during the storm's recovery phase in southern China's low-latitude region (geomagnetic latitude ~ 7.3–24° N) and experienced severe dissipation during their propagation from south to north. Although the initial relative amplitude of the nighttime LSTID was ~ 60% larger than that of the morning event, the nighttime event dissipated more quickly than the morning event because of a strong nighttime enhancement in background total electronic content (TEC) during storm time, which led to strong ion-drag dissipation during the evening. The poleward-propagating LSTIDs exhibit a narrower latitudinal range, a smaller amplitude, and a slightly higher elevation compared with the equatorward-moving LSTIDs observed in the same region. Given these features, the poleward-propagating LSTIDs were likely excited by some local source near southern China. Excitation of secondary LSTIDs during the dissipation of some primary medium-scale disturbances from the lower atmosphere is a possible mechanism.

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