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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 6
Ann. Geophys., 13, 641–647, 1995
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00585-995-0641-7
© European Geosciences Union 1995
Ann. Geophys., 13, 641–647, 1995
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00585-995-0641-7
© European Geosciences Union 1995

  30 Jun 1995

30 Jun 1995

Mid-latitude summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes

P. Keckhut P. Keckhut

Abstract. Temperature and wind data obtained with Rayleigh lidar since 1979 and Russian rockets since 1964 are analyzed to deduce the summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes. The equivalent width of the 1083 nm He I line is used as a proxy to monitor the short-term UV flux changes. Spectral analyses are performed on 108-day windows to extract the 27-day component from temperature, wind and solar data sets. Linear regressions between these spectral harmonics show some significant correlations around 45 km at mid-latitudes. For large 27-day solar cycles, amplitudes of 2 K and 6 m s-1 are calculated for temperature data series over the south of France (44°N), and on wind data series over Volgograd (49°N), respectively. Cross-spectrum analyses have indicated correlations between these atmospheric parameters and the solar proxy with a phase lag of less than 2 days. These statistically correlative results, which provide good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations, are both obtained at mid-latitude. However, the observed amplitudes are larger than expected, with numerical models suggesting that dynamical processes such as equatorial or gravity waves may be responsible.

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